This program was made possible by a grant from the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry's Campaign for America's Kids.

Last updated July 2013

about

 
In children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD), there is an ongoing pattern of uncooperative, defiant, and hostile behavior toward authority figures that seriously interferes with the youngster's day to day functioning.

All children are oppositional from time to time, particularly when tired, hungry, stressed or upset. They may argue, talk back, disobey, and defy parents, teachers, and other adults.  Oppositional behavior is often a normal part of development for two to three year olds and early adolescents.However, openly uncooperative and hostile behavior becomes a serious concern when it is so frequent and consistent that it stands out when compared with other children of the same age and developmental level and when it affects the child's social, family, and academic life.

  For additional information see:

Choose a topic:

 

frequently asked questions
  1. What causes Oppositional Defiant Disorder
  2. Does Oppositional Defiant Disorder get better or go away over time?
  3. How is Oppositional Defiant Disorder treated
  4. Can Oppositional Defiant Disorder be prevented?

(back to top)



facts for families

AACAP's Facts for Families provide concise up-to-date information on issues that affect children, teenagers, and their families.

(back to top)



video clips

Oppositional Defiant Disorder
Melvin Oatis, M.D.
(Apr 2008)
duration: 02:21

Oppositional Defiant Disorder - Other Concerns
Melvin Oatis, M.D.
(Apr 2008)
duration: 01:52

(back to top)



clinical resources

Practice Parameters
Considered resources for experts, mental health professional and physicians, AACAP’s practice parameters were developed to guide clinical decision making. They show the best treatments and the range of treatment options available to families living with childhood and adolescent mental illness.

Click here for the Practice Parameter for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents With Oppositional Defiant Disorder.

Many children with attentional disorders show signs of oppositional defiant disorder. This is known as having a co-occurring, or co-morbid condition. Physicians should read the PocketCard Guidelines on Managing Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder to learn about treatment strategies that address ADHD and ODD.

Lifelong Learning Modules

(back to top)

research and training

Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Meetings and Online CME

(back to top)

books

AACAP's publications, Your Child and Your Adolescent, offer accessible, comprehensive information about the emotional development and behavior of children from infancy through the teenage years.

 

 

(back to top)

getting help

Getting help is the most important thing that parents can do for children and adolescents with oppositional defiant disorder. Parents should try to find a mental health professional who has advanced training and experience with evaluating and treating children, adolescents, and families. It is important to find a comfortable match between your child, your family, and the mental health professional.

A child and adolescent psychiatrist is a physician who specializes in the diagnosis and, treatment of disorders of thinking, feeling and behavior that affect children, adolescents, and their families. Child and adolescent psychiatrists have completed four years of medical school, at least three years of residency training in medicine, neurology, or general psychiatry with adults, and two years of additional training in psychiatric work with children, adolescents, and their families.

Click here to find a child and adolescent psychiatrist in your area.

Bear in mind that because of the extensive training required, there is a nationwide shortage of child and adolescent psychiatrists. To learn more about other mental health professionals and places where families can find help, read Where to Find Help For Your Child.

Related Web Sites

This program was made possible by a grant from the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry's Campaign for America's Kids.

(back to top)