New York Information
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Thank you to AACAP’s Local Arrangements Committee for putting together a Restaurant and Entertainment Guide for New York!

Things to do in NYC!

9/11 Memorial & Museum: Finished just in time for the 10th anniversary of 9/11, these 30-foot waterfalls sit on the footprint where the Twin Towers once stood. The pools are each nearly an acre in size, and they are said to be the largest man-made waterfalls in North America. Edging the 9/11 Memorial pools at the plaza level are bronze panels inscribed with the names of the 2,983 people who were killed in the terror attacks at the World Trade Center site, in Flight 93’s crash in Pennsylvania, at the Pentagon, and the six people who died in the World Trade Center bombing in 1993.

Central Park: Spanning 843 acres in the heart of Manhattan, Central Park is one of the world’s greatest urban oases, encompassing a diverse landscape of rolling fields, walking trails and tranquil bodies of water–all sculpted by human hands. Designed in the mid-19th century by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux, Central Park is the centerpiece of the City’s public parks system. Among its attractions are the Central Park Zoo, Belvedere Castle and the Friedsam Memorial Carousel (which, weather permitting, operates seven days a week from April through October and intermittently the rest of the year). Sheep Meadow and the Great Lawn offer sprawling expanses where visitors can relax and enjoy the outdoors. In the winter, there’s ice-skating at Trump Rink, which provides a picturesque backdrop for that classic cold-weather pastime, and at a second Trump-run skating spot, Lasker Rink, in a quiet section at the northern edge of the park (each has a warm-weather alter ego, the former as amusement park Victorian Gardens and the latter as Lasker Pool). In the summer, the Delacorte Theater hosts Shakespeare in the Park, outdoor performances of the Bard’s work. Elsewhere, Rumsey Playfield serves as the primary home for SummerStage, a citywide (mostly) free performing-arts festival featuring music, dance, theater and more. Notably, Rumsey hosts Metropolitan Opera recitals featuring singers and a pianist from the famed opera company. For more ideas on what to see while visiting the sprawling NYC green space, check out this slideshow of must-see Central Park sights.

Delegate Discount Pass: The Delegate Discount Pass is your ultimate guide to exclusive savings throughout the City. Redeem this offer by showing a printed or mobile version of the NYC & Company Delegate Discount Pass in its entirety at participating member restaurants and attractions, unless provided with a promo code for advance reservations, purchase or registration.

Discount Broadway Tickets: You won't want to miss out on all the great plays and musicals that Broadway has to offer! NYC & Company has discounted tickets available for your disposal!

Downtown Manhattan: Lower Manhattan is the seat of the City’s government, the home of Wall Street and a place where much of America’s early history unfolded. The area is packed with cultural institutions, including the Skyscraper Museum and the Museum of Jewish Heritage. Battery Park features 25 acres of open space–including gardens and the Castle Clinton National Monument, a fort built in preparation for the War of 1812. Stone Street, an appropriately named cobblestone thoroughfare, features a wide range of worthwhile drinking and dining establishments including Harry’s Cafe and Steak, Vintry Wine & Whiskey and many more. Nearby, City Hall–one of America’s oldest functioning seats of municipal government–offers public tours. After visiting the premises, consider walking across the iconic Brooklyn Bridge, located just across the street. For more on downtown, see the Lower Manhattan page.

Empire State Building: With a pencil-slim silhouette, recognizable virtually worldwide, the Empire State Building is an Art Deco monument to progress, a symbol for New York City, and a star in some great romantic scenes, on- and off-screen. The views of the city from the 86th-floor deck are spectacular, but the views from 16 stories up on the 102nd-floor observatory are even more so–and yet, fewer visitors make it this far. Tickets are: $22 for adults; $45 for an “express pass” that whisks you pass the hordes. For an extra $15 you can buy a ticket to the more intimate 102nd-floor observation deck. Buy your ticket online to reduce waiting-in-line time.

Grand Central Terminal: Take the express back to a bygone era. Grand Central Terminal – don’t call it Grand Central Station – is a living, bustling temple to New York’s illustrious past. Gaze at the celestial ceiling mural above the vast main concourse. Slurp some Kumamotos at the legendary Oyster Bar downstairs, and wash them down with a Manhattan at the swank Campbell Apartment. Tell a secret to your partner in the Whispering Gallery: stand at the end of either Oyster Bar ramp and whisper into the wall; you’ll be heard way across on the other side. Mingle with the commuters in the gourmet culinary market. Explore the “secret” elevated passageways for a spectacular view of the concourse. Even if you have nowhere to go you can spend hours in the 100-year-old depot and never get bored.

NYC Museums: No trip to New York City is complete without experiencing some of its world-class cultural institutions, and Museum Mile is a good place to start. This stretch of Fifth Avenue, from East 82nd to East 105th Streets–actually measuring a little longer than a mile–lays claim to one of the world’s densest concentrations of culture. Museums along the “Mile” include The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Neue Galerie, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the National Academy Museum & School, Cooper Hewitt, National Design Museum, the Jewish Museum, the Museum of the City of New York and El Museo del Barrio.

Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island: The Statue of Liberty is New York City’s most recognizable landmark, a gleaming beacon for generations of immigrants seeking a better life in America. To visit the monument, buy tickets online in advance of your trip at statuecruises.com. (Though you can see Lady Liberty from land, the short ferry ride to Liberty Island will bring you up close and personal.

The High Line: Once a railroad track carrying freight trains, this elevated space–running from Gansevoort Street in the Meatpacking District (at the Whitney Museum of Art) to West 34th Street–has been transformed into a wonderful retreat from the hubbub of the city. A long, landscaped “walking park” with plants, curving walkways, picnic tables and benches, public art installations, and views of the Hudson River and the Manhattan skyline, The High Line is now one of the most visited parks in New York City.

Times Square: Not sure where to look while walking through world-famous Times Square? Don’t worry–you’re not alone. With massive digital billboards whose bright lights make midnight look like midafternoon; star-studded Broadway and Off-Broadway shows (and reduced-price tickets to see them available from the TKTS Discount Booth); people peddling art and jewelry on the street; and, of course, the Naked Cowboy–who plays guitar in his tighty-whities–the expansive stretch of Midtown is a feast for all five senses. Visitors can shop in popular emporiums like The Disney Store, take pictures with wax celebrities at Madame Tussauds, watch the ball drop on New Year’s Eve or grab a pre- or post-theater meal along Restaurant Row (West 46th Street, between Eighth and Ninth Avenues), where many eateries offer prix-fixe deals. And with Broadway closed to cars from West 42nd to West 47th Streets, Times Square is now more pedestrian friendly than ever.

TV Show Tapings: It's fun—and free—to attend the tapings of popular television shows shot in New York City. You get to see huge stars up close, and if you're lucky, your friends at home might even see you on TV. The wait for advance tickets is often long, so it's best to write in for them or reserve online far before your desired date. Still, many shows have standby options if you're willing to wait in line.

For more information on things to do in New York, visit www.nycgo.com.